How To Manage Sugar Levels In Diabetics?

Diabetes is a serious disorder that troubles the patients for a lifetime.

A diabetic has to compromise a lot of the sweets and is in a constant fear of infection.

Diabetes can lead to severe adverse effects that can cause glaucoma and seizures in advanced stage.(1)

The sugar levels go abruptly high in diabetes which is very hard to control.

A normal plasma sugar level is essential for the physiological functions such as cardiac functions, memory, reproductive fertility, and vision.(2)

Plasma glucose level should, therefore, be maintained well below 200 mg/dl.

To ensure you have the right sugar level you should alter lifestyle and take medical advice.

 

Here Are a Few Successfully Tried Tips That Can Aid In Maintaining Normal Sugar Levels For Diabetics

Diabetes Can Be Controlled

 

• Diabetics with poor eating habits are at a high risk of fluctuations in sugar levels.

 Rather, eating smaller meals more frequently with a couple of hours break is the mantra.

√ Do not skip a meal but because that may result in a severe drop in glucose due to starvation, what’s’ more, further when you eat something, the pancreas is burdened to synthesize more insulin.(3)

• Low-fat dairy products, monounsaturated fats (walnut) reduce the risk of developing insulin resistance.

 High fiber protein (ground nuts and other legumes) rich food helps to stabilize sugar and insulin levels.(4)

Vitamin D helps control the blood sugar levels.(5)

• Spinach is a wonderful sugar controller.

The magnesium in it can prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Magnesium rich food items such as ground nuts.(6)

• Drinking alcohol may not be good for health but in moderate amounts in some cases can be good for diabetics.(7)

 But avoid drinking wine soon after meals as it can reduce the levels of insulin in the body.(8)

• While grapefruit is a very good weight loss aid, it also reduces the sugar levels due to efficient sugar metabolism.(9)

• Diabetics are encouraged to walk at least 2 kilometers a day. Weekly 10 km walk has found to reduce the mortality rate of diabetics due to severe complications.(10)

• A good exercise is an ideal for growing muscles and increasing their resistance. This, in turn, keeps the cells more responsive to insulin so that plasma glucose is used up by the cells.

• A sound sleep of 8 hours every day will help keep the blood sugar and insulin levels in check. Sleep deprivation is not good as can cause fatigue, daytime sleepiness, clumsiness and weight loss or weight gain(11)(12)

• Coffee is surely hard to resist. It keeps you active and lively. But it does raise the blood sugar levels. So switch to decaffeinated coffee and reduce the risk of rising glucose levels in the blood.(13)

• Laugh out loud!!! Yes, laughing out loud is the best way to keep sugar levels at normal levels. Whether you are diabetic or not, laughing activates the cells and increases the thermogenesis thus burning more and more calories so you remain light and active.(14)

Leave the tension to your enemies and just laugh out loud.


 

Researches and references

(1) http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/
(2) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperglycemia
(3) http://spectrum.ieee.org/biomedical/bionics/diabetes-has-a-new-enemy-robopancreas
(4) http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/features/diabetic-diet-6-foods-control-blood-sugar
(5) https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/type-ii-diabetes/
(6) http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/news/20031223/magnesium-lowers-type-2-diabetes-risk
(7) http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/making-healthy-food-choices/alcohol.html
(8) http://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes-and-alcohol.html
(9) http://www.nhs.uk/news/2014/10October/Pages/Grapefruit-juice-may-protect-against-diabetes.aspx
(10) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2992225/
(11) http://www.prevention.com/health/diabetes/how-sleep-can-improve-your-blood-sugar
(12) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_deprivation
(13) http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/expert-answers/blood-sugar/faq-20057941
(14) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3725077/